Wednesday, July 18, 2012

US Public schools are so bad some parents send their children overseas

To some Africans in U.S., children’s education is best left to the homeland is an interesting article.  It starts with:

----------
Twelve-year-old Oladimeji Elujoba kept getting into fights at Roberto Clemente Middle School in Germantown. Every time the teacher took attendance in the morning, she would stumble over his polysyllabic name and inadvertently elicit jeers and giggles from his classmates.


“I’m not the kind of person to watch people laugh at me,” Elujoba, now 17, says matter-of-factly.


And so he fought. He fought so much he got in-school suspensions, out-of-school suspensions, after-school detentions. His parents, Ruth and Olalekan Elujoba, worried.


“One of the teachers in the middle school called me,” Olalekan Elujoba recalls. “They had suspended him and said that if I don’t take any action on this, I will spoil the boy’s future. I couldn’t sleep that night.”


Within a few weeks, Olalekan Elujoba had decided what to do. His two sons, Oladimeji and Kunle, later followed by his daughter, Comfort, would go to boarding school.
----------

I hope more parents find out about the option of homeschooling.  It would be a lot cheaper than sending your children to a boarding school in another country, and better for the family.

Hat tip: Instapundit

2 comments:

Luke said...

"I hope more parents find out about the option of homeschooling. It would be a lot cheaper than sending your children to a boarding school in another country, and better for the family."

Seriously. It's been fascinating watching documentaries about public schools and charter schools. My mother-in-law, who works as a school nurse, mentioned that parents don't have a clue that homeschooling is an option... nor do educators who are concerned about fixing the system. And that's sad.

~Luke

C T said...

I know a family that immigrated from Ghana, and the teenager, when asked about school here in Colorado (D11), said it was "easy". They came here for a better life, but if they don't pay attention to their kids' educations, the children will be worse off academically than if they'd stayed in Africa.